Fiscal Policy

  • Vermont should tax resource-extraction when resources are exported as raw materials. But we should allow significant tax-breaks when companies turn raw materials into value-added products using Vermont labour and capital.
  • However, Vermont residents who consume natural resources for their own sustainance should have never be taxed by the State. For example, the state should never tax people for consuming water from a well on their property.
  • Vermont should explore creating a State-owned bank that would work with private VT-based banks, to insulate VT from Wall Street corruption, and to increase investment capital for VT businesses, modeled after the very successful State-owned Bank of North Dakota.
  • Vermont needs a stable currency that is valued based on our productive activity and not manipulated by Wall Street and the unconstitutional, private central bank known as the Federal Reserve
  • A State-owned bank could also serve as an “Emergency Fund,” offering low-interest loans to any Vermont resident to cover health-care or other emergencies like fuel-assistance, unemployment, temporary food-subsidies for people who are laid off/sick, or otherwise unable to provide for themselves. This emergency-loan function alone could eliminate the need for a bloated state social service bureaucracy while still providing a strong safety net and encouraging personal responsibility.
  • Fiscal policy needs to provide market-based incentives to encourage sustainable production and manufacturing, prioritizing diversified local food production, processing centers and distribution; and through incentives create a revitalized, sustainable value-added forestry and biomass industry.
  • We need to strengthen Vermont's banking and finance sectors with incentives for Vermonters who invest and bank with locally-owned institutions.
  • Vermont should keep all State pension and operating funds invested in Vermont financial institutions, encouraging state-wide clean-energy loan funds and local small-business credit-markets. I know that every teacher in the state would be glad to see Wall Street never get a dime of Vermont public pension funds again.
  • We must reduce school and social-services budgets at the State level, and enable counties and towns to take these responsibilities on based on their needs and budgets. It’s time to do more with less, regardless of any idealogy. We need to use technology and community incentives to increase volunteer support and reduce costs.
  • Education tax: Reform Act 60, decentralize control education and put communities back in control of their school budgets, programs, testing methods and the associated property taxes.